David McKenzie

David McKenzie is a Lead Economist in the Development Research Group, Finance and Private Sector Development Unit. He received his B.Com.(Hons)/B.A. from the University of Auckland, New Zealand and his Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University. Prior to joining the World Bank, he spent four years as an assistant professor of Economics at Stanford University. His main research is on migration, microenterprises, and methodology for use with developing country data.  

Content by David McKenzie
  • Blog post

    Bad practices hold back small firms in developing countries

    Survey of more than 20,000 small firms suggests better business practices are correlated with higher productivity, firm profits, and rates of survival. Management practices in large firms around the world have been systematically measured and reported in a series of papers by Bloom and Van Reenen (2007, 2010) and Bloom et al. (2012). These papers show that better...

    30 Jun 2017 | David McKenzie, Christopher Woodruff

  • Blog post

    What happens when you give $50,000 to an aspiring Nigerian entrepreneur?

    Most firms in developing countries have no paid workers, and hardly any reach the size of 10 workers or more. For example, Hsieh and Olken (2014, p.93) report that in India and Indonesia “the fraction of firms with less than 10 workers is almost visually indistinguishable from 100 percent”, and in Nigeria, survey data indicate that 99.6 percent of firms have fewer than...

    10 Sep 2015 | David McKenzie

  • Publication - Working Paper

    Does management matter? Evidence from India (Working Paper)

    1 Dec 2010 | Nick Bloom, Benn Eifert, Aprajit Mahajan, David McKenzie, John Roberts

  • Project

    Making good management stick: Evidence from India

    A long-standing question in social science is to what extent differences in management cause differences in firm performance. To investigate this we ran a management field experiment on large Indian textile firms. We provided free consulting on modern management practices to a randomly chosen set of treatment plants and compared their performance to the control plants....

    1 Mar 2010 | Nick Bloom, Benn Eifert, Aprajit Mahajan, David McKenzie, John Roberts