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  • Blog post

    Can the microcredit model be improved?

    The long-term impact of microcredit on peoples’ lives is limited: new research reveals it can help more people by modifying and extending its model. Microcredit is frequently touted as an effective policy tool to fight global poverty. Its global profile was elevated in 2006 when Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank won the Nobel Peace Prize for pioneering microcredit....

    30 Jul 2019 | Vikas Dimble, Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak

  • Blog post

    What will aid and development look like under UK Prime Minister Johnson?

    As the Conservative Party leadership contest draws to a close, Britain has finally seen a new Prime Minister enter the famous black door of 10 Downing Street. It’s a surprise to few that Boris Johnson has won the race to succeed Theresa May, opening a new chapter in the nation’s Brexit saga. What lies ahead for the development sector? In the 2016 referendum, Johnson...

    25 Jul 2019 | Jamie Green

  • Blog post

    Should I stay or should I go? Managing populations with urban to rural migration incentives

    Sydney you’ve got to let me know, should they stay or should they go. In 2011, Sydney, the largest city in Australia, asked its residents, should they stay or should they go? Despite regularly rated as one of the world’s top ten liveable cities, the government was offering residents AUD$7,000 (£4,500 or ~one month’s average wage) to move to the country’s rural...

    22 Jul 2019 | Oliver Harman

  • Blog post

    Replenishing the rice bowl: Productivity and quality in Myanmar’s rice export industry

    Myanmar’s rice industry can be reignited by reforms. However, key challenges need to be addressed for the country to re-establish itself in the international market. Myanmar once held the distinction of being the world’s largest exporter of rice, accounting for one-third of the global rice trade in 1934-1935. Post-independence nationalisation of the industry was...

    17 Jul 2019 | Siddhartha Basu , Sudhanshu Sharma

  • Blog post

    What can we learn from the market for skilled workers in Sierra Leone?

    Many developing countries focus on education to produce a productive workforce. Human capital models in economics support this. But what we can learn from the Sierra Leonean context is that a push for education and skills development is just one component on the supply side. Most of the world’s population, and therefore labour force, live in developing countries. Yet...

    20 Jun 2019 | Jamelia Harris

  • Blog post

    Mining taxation policy in Zambia: The tyranny of indecision

    Instability, massive increases and novel taxes not seen anywhere in the world’. That is the way the outgoing Zambia Chamber of Mines President, Nathan Chishimba, described the new tax measures targeted at the mining sector in the 2019 budget. The Zambian government has charged that these new measures will ensure that the sector is paying its fair share of taxes, but the...

    13 Jun 2019 | Twivwe Siwale, Benjamin Chibuye

  • Blog post

    What do surveys and SMS data reveal about Kigali’s unplanned settlements?

    Households living in unplanned areas of Kigali make complex trade-offs in terms of where they work and live. We use face-to-face and SMS surveys to understand these trade-offs as well as general patterns in migration, employment, mobility, housing, and access to infrastructure and services. Building an understanding of these dynamics is key for urban upgrading and more...

    10 Jun 2019 | Anirudh Rajashekar, Dimitri Stoelinga

  • Blog post

    Women’s mobility and labour force participation in Karachi: Some preliminary observations

    Pakistan has the lowest female labour-force participation rate in South Asia[1] and urban areas perform especially poorly[2]. Distinct patriarchal norms interlinked with migrant status can affect women’s autonomy and thus labour-force participation in different ways. Recently the Collective for Social Science Research conducted fieldwork for the IGC supported project...

    7 Jun 2019 | Natasha Ansari

  • Blog post

    Adapting to climate change through temporary migration in Bangladesh

    With climate change, we are seeing more extreme weather events and increasingly frequent hazards, putting agriculture and rural livelihoods at ever greater risk. Temporary migration can help households withstand these types of short-term hardships and income deficits, and may be a viable mechanism for adapting “in place” to changing environmental conditions. However,...

    29 May 2019 | Joyce Chen, Nazmul Hassan

  • Blog post

    Getting the right institutions in place to run Africa’s cities efficiently

    Over the next 16 years, all of the world’s 10 fastest growing cities are going to be in Africa. If this growth is a process of people voting with their feet, as last year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics Paul Romer once put it, these cities are winning. Yet urbanisation in many developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is not delivering the...

    22 May 2019 | Astrid Haas, Shahrukh Wani