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  • Blog post

    Time is now: Pressing for progress for all women and girls

    On International Women’s Day, the IGC hosted a high-level panel discussion on gender inequality and press coverage for girls and women. Laura Sili explores the themes touched upon at this event, and reflects on the global movement towards gender equality the world has witnessed in 2017. International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change...

    8 Mar 2018 | Laura Sili

  • Blog post

    Vocational training programs in India are leaving women behind, but this needn’t be the case

    Less than 25% of women are employed in their skilled job for more than three months and are also less likely to receive and accept job offers than men. Migration is a key constraint, with job location being a strong predictor of female outcomes. Skill India Many low- and middle-income countries have launched government-funded vocational training programmes to help youth...

    23 Feb 2018 | Charity Troyer Moore

  • Blog post

    The economic gender gap in the garment sector in Bangladesh and Ghana

    An oversupply of female entrepreneurs results in fewer opportunities for women. This is compounded by higher costs of changing jobs for women due to household responsibilities, and promotion rates being significantly lower for females than males. The gender gap and economic participation The findings of the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) research on closing the gender gap...

    31 Jan 2018 | Laura Sili

  • Blog post

    Women’s Financial Inclusion: 5 Reasons Why it Matters for Mozambique

    The IGC recently published a policy brief that discusses the obstacles to financial inclusion in Mozambique. It tackles two of the main challenges: the low levels of financial literacy and the absence of interoperability. Novella Maugeri (Country Economist, IGC Mozambique) analyses this brief from the perspective of gender empowerment. How do you get your money from the...

    19 Dec 2017 | Novella Maugeri

  • Blog post

    Women’s economic opportunities: What can South Asian countries learn from each other?

    When women make their own money – or even when they have the option to work for a fair wage – their health, power in the domestic sphere, and position in society all improve, and parents begin to invest more in the health and education of their daughters. A wide range of research from South Asia and across the world has shown this. For example, a study in India...

    22 Mar 2017 | Charity Troyer Moore, Vestal McIntyre

  • Blog post

    Getting India's women into the workforce: Time for a smart approach

    In this article, Rohini Pande, the Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, contends that raising India’s stubbornly low rate of female labour force participation will require behavioural interventions that address social norms. Between 1990 and 2015, India’s real GDP (gross domestic product) per capita grew from US$375 to US$1572, but its...

    20 Mar 2017 | Rohini Pande

  • Blog post

    Bride & prejudice: The price of education

    Leveraging the cultural practice of bride price could help amplify investments in female education and improve effects of large-scale school-building programmes. Without other subsidies, well-intentioned activism against bride-price may cause more harm than good for investing in girls’ education. Bride price, a common custom in parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia,...

    10 Oct 2016 | Nava Ashraf, Natalie Bau, Nathan Nunn, Alessandra Voena

  • Blog post

    Do women in power have an impact on corruption?

    Whether women are inherently less corrupt than men remains open to debate, but studies suggest that women in positions of power can reduce corruption. Several studies in social and behavioural sciences have found that women behave differently than men in many walks of life. For instance, research in psychology reports substantial gender differences in moral and helping...

    21 Jan 2015 | Chandan Jha, Sudipta Sarangi

  • Blog post

    Does political reservation for women improve programme delivery?

    This column outlines results of a study that assesses the impact of women leaders on corruption and other aspects of the quality of delivery of MNREGA. It argues that administrative experience, training and institutional support are essential for making women’s political participation and affirmative action policies more effective. Political reservations for women create...

    17 Jan 2013 | Farzana Afridi