Daniel Posner

Daniel N. Posner is the James S. Coleman Professor of International Development in the Department of Political Science at UCLA. His research focuses on ethnic politics, research design, distributive politics and the political economy of development in Africa. His most recent co-authored book, Coethnicity: Diversity and the Dilemmas of Collective Action (Russell Sage, 2009) employs experimental games to probe the sources of poor public goods provision in ethnically diverse communities. His first book, Institutions and Ethnic Politics in Africa (Cambridge, 2005), explains the conditions under which politics revolves around one dimension of ethnic cleavage rather than another. He has received several awards for his work, including the Luebbert Award for best book in Comparative Politics (2006 and 2010), the Heinz Eulau Award for the best article in the American Political Science Review (2008), the Michael Wallerstein Award for the best article in Political Economy (2008), the best book award from the African Politics Conference Group (2006), and the Sage Award for the best paper in Comparative Politics presented at the APSA annual meeting (2004). He has been a Harvard Academy Scholar (1995-98), a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution (2001-02), a Carnegie Scholar (2003-05) and a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (2010-11). He currently serves on the editorial boards of World Politics, PS, the Journal of Experimental Political Science and the Annual Review of Political Science. He is the co-founder of the Working Group in African Political Economy (WGAPE). He received his BA from Dartmouth College and his PhD from Harvard University.

Content by Daniel Posner
  • Project

    When does the state deliver? An analysis of procurement practices among local governments in Ghana

    Under what conditions do bureaucrats and politicians have an incentive to defraud the state through corrupt procurement practices? Public officers regularly award contracts to private companies to construct public goods. However, these elites often abuse their position and award contracts to politically connected firms in return for campaign donations or personal kickbacks....

    16 Dec 2015 | Daniel Posner, Sarah Brierley