Giorgia Maffini

Giorgia Maffini is a Leverhulme Trust Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation at Saïd Business School. Her areas of expertise include public finance, taxation and business taxation.

Giorgia has been a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation since 2006 and since 2012 she is a Leverhulme Trust Fellow, having been awarded a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship to pursue her reasearch on the effects of taxes on business behaviour.

Since May 2010, she has also been a visiting Lecturer at the Department of Policy Analysis and Public Management, Bocconi University, Italy, where she teaches Business Law and Public Finance. Previously Giorgia was an Economist at the Centre for Tax Policy and Administration (CTPA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris (2004-2005); a Research Assistant at the Department of Economics of the University of Warwick (2003-2004) and at the Institute of Political Economy, Bocconi University, Italy (2001-2002).

Giorgia holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Warwick; a PhD in Public Finance from the University of Pavia, Italy; a Masters in Economics from University College of London; and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Social Sciences from Bocconi University, Milan, Italy (summa cum laude).

Giorgia’s research has been published in leading academic journals, policy papers, and book chapters. She has received media coverage from The New York Times, The Guardian, Business Week, Les Echos and Il Sole 24 Ore. She has been a peer reviewer for the British Tax Review, the Economic Journal, FinanzArchive, International Tax and Public Finance, the Journal of Comparative Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, and Labour Economics. She is a member of the International Institute of Public Finance (IIPF).

Content by Giorgia Maffini
  • Project

    The Taxation of Multinational Corporations in Developing Countries

    The provision of public services and infrastructure is an important factor for economic growth. But in many developing countries, the quantity and quality of public services are low. One explanation for this is that these countries find it much more difficult to raise tax revenue than developed countries. This research project will focus on multinational firms as an...

    4 Sep 2014 | Clemens Fuest, Michael Devereux, Giorgia Maffini