Girum Abebe

Girum Abebe is a researcher at the Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI). He obtained his Ph.D. in Development Economics in September 2011. His main research interest is the application of field experiments in development economics to study the constraints that face enterprises in developing countries. He has been actively engaged in field experiment designs, particularly in the implementation and impact evaluation of business and management skills training to young entrepreneurs, as well as the impact evaluation of job-search-assistance schemes to young unemployed job-seekers. He has also been studying the mechanisms firms employ to gain new knowledge from technology leaders at home and abroad, and the roles human capital and agglomeration economies play in the learning process.

Content by Girum Abebe
  • Multimedia Item - Video

    Video: Helping young Ethiopians find jobs

    IGC researcher Girum Abebe of the Ethiopian Development Research Institute discusses a randomised evaluation of two job programmes helping young Ethiopians find jobs in Addis Ababa.

    28 Jan 2019

  • Publication - Working Paper

    Curse of anonymity or tyranny of distance? (Working paper)

    18 Aug 2016 | Girum Abebe, Stefano Caria, Marcel Fafchamps, Paolo Falco, Simon Franklin, Simon Quinn

  • Project

    Do managers use financial incentives effectively? Evidence from a field experiment in urban Ethiopia

    Firms in developing countries find it hard to recruit adequately skilled workers, and to motivate and retain them (World Bank, 2013; IGC, 2014). Yet, recent evidence suggests that many firms do not use standard financial rewards to attract high quality workers and increase their performance (Bloom et al., 2010; Fafchamps and Woodruff, 2014). Are financial rewards too costly...

    16 Dec 2015 | Simon Quinn, Stefano Caria, Girum Abebe

  • Project

    Assisting Job Search in Low-Employment Communities

    In Africa, where young people often struggle to find good jobs, the cost of searching for jobs and lack of information can prevent businesses from matching up successfully with young job-seekers. A randomised evaluation of two job-search programmes for young people in Addis Ababa aimed to address this problem. Findings suggest that young job-seekers who attend...

    5 Sep 2014 | Simon Quinn, Girum Abebe, Stefano Caria, Paolo Falco, Simon Franklin