Tim Dyson

Tim Dyson is Professor of Population Studies in the Department of International Development at LSE. He has worked a lot on the demography of India. In 2001 he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy, and in 2015 he gave the keynote address on the first day of the forty-eighth session of the United Nations Commission on Population and Development in New York. His main areas of research have included work on demographic time series, interactions between populations and their food supplies, famine demography, HIV/AIDS, urbanization, child mortality trends, climate change, democratization, and the past, present and future population of the Indian subcontinent. His latest book is Population and Development—the Demographic Transition, published by Zed in 2010. His latest article is ‘On Demographic and Democratic Transitions’, Population and Development Review 38 (Supp.): 83-102.

Content by Tim Dyson
  • Blog post

    Part 2: Is population growth good or bad for economic development?

    In our previous post we described the shifting views of economists and demographers regarding the relationship between population growth and economic development. In short, rapid population growth in developing countries was thought to be a problem in the 1950s and 1960s, irrelevant (or even positive) in the 1970s and 1980s, and again an obstacle to robust economic growth...

    11 Dec 2015 | Sean Fox, Tim Dyson

  • Blog post

    Part 1: Is population growth good or bad for economic development?

    This post is the first in a two part series exploring the relationship between population growth and economic development – a relationship that appears to have changed over time. See here for part two Part 1 The relationship between population growth and economic development has been a recurrent theme in economic analysis since at least 1798 when Thomas Malthus...

    3 Dec 2015 | Sean Fox, Tim Dyson