Yaw Nyarko

Yaw Nyarko is a Professor of Economics at New York University and the Director of the Center for Technology and Economic Development. He is also the Co-Director of the Development Research Institute, winner of the 2009 BBVA Frontiers in Knowledge Award on Economic Development Cooperation, and Founding Director of NYU Africa House. A theoretical economist, his current work focuses on models where the economic actors engage in active learning about their environments and human capital models of economic growth and development. He is the author of many published research papers and the recipient of numerous awards and grants, including many from the National Science Foundation. He has been a consultant to many organisations including the World Bank, the United Nations, and the Social Science Research Council.

Content by Yaw Nyarko
  • Project

    Building capacity for the Ghana Commodities Exchange

    Formally lauched in November 2018, the Ghana Commodities Exchange (GCX) is set to transform agricultural markets in Ghana. The GCX links farmers with traders more effectively, and provides facilities like grain storage and quality control. To ensure the smooth running of the exchange upon its opening, this project sought to build technical capacity amongst its...

    16 Jan 2019 | Yaw Nyarko

  • Project

    Formal evaluation of the Ghana Commodities Exchange

    Commodities exchanges have become a policy priority for many governments in Sub-Saharan Africa, with the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange setting the stage for other countries to follow. The Ghana Commodities Exchange (GCX) is on its way to becoming fully operational. Using multiple data sources, including a mobile phone app developed in a previous IGC project, this...

    7 Sep 2017 | Yaw Nyarko

  • Project

    Commodity exchanges in Africa: A solution to challenges smallholder farmers face?

    Many African smallholder farmers complain, often loudly, about what in Ghana some farmers call the lack of “marketing” – by which they mean the lack of consistent output markets for their food crops.   In Sub-Saharan Africa output markets for food crops remain fragmented, and often involve individual traders going to farms to collect relatively small amounts of the...

    15 Apr 2015 | Yaw Nyarko