Showing all content in Kenya

  • Blog post

    Informal taxation in rural Kenya

    The informal taxation system in Kenya is widespread and regressive. It responds to changes in permanent income, rather than temporary income, suggesting that permanent income increases are important for public goods provision. A central question in development economics is how to fund public goods such as water resources, roads, and schools. The standard mechanism of doing...

    21 Mar 2018 | Michael Walker

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    The economics of rural electrification: Evidence from Kenya

    12 Jan 2018 | Ken Lee, Edward Miguel, Catherine Wolfram

  • Blog post

    Mobile money: Leaving no one behind in the digital age

    Kenya and Tanzania provide evidence on how technology holds promise for an inclusive, empowered and poverty-free future. Government support and improved financial literacy are found to be key drivers of financial inclusion in the developing world. Mobile money, one of the most popular innovations for development, is considered by many as a promising tool to open the door...

    3 Nov 2017 | Laura Sili

  • Blog post

    Mobile money: Progress thus far, miles to go

    2017 marks ten years since the launch of M-PESA in Kenya, undoubtedly the most successful mobile money product to date. Over the last decade, there have been many developments in the sector, and mobile money has emerged as a predominantly African innovation. A recent conference on Mobile Money and Financial Development, organised by the LSE’s Department of Management and...

    30 Oct 2017 | Sarah Logan

  • Multimedia Item - Video

    James Mwangi: Challenges for private sector in fragile states

    James Mwangi, Managing Director and CEO of the Equity Group Holdings Plc, talks about the opportunities and challenges for businesses operating in fragile states.

    24 Oct 2017

  • Country

    Kenya

    18 Oct 2017

  • Project

    Liquidity constraints, presumptive taxation, and tax compliance: Experimental evidence from Kenya

    Tax evasion generates significant losses in government revenues and can lead to large distortions in the economy. Evasion is of particular concern in developing countries, where the share of the informal economy is typically larger and the government has limited sources of information. Over the last decade, an increasing number of revenue authorities around the world have...

    26 Jul 2017 | Lorenzo Casaburi, Dina D. Pomeranz

  • Blog post

    Bad practices hold back small firms in developing countries

    Survey of more than 20,000 small firms suggests better business practices are correlated with higher productivity, firm profits, and rates of survival. Management practices in large firms around the world have been systematically measured and reported in a series of papers by Bloom and Van Reenen (2007, 2010) and Bloom et al. (2012). These papers show that better...

    30 Jun 2017 | David McKenzie, Christopher Woodruff

  • Project

    Tracking constraints to entrepreneurship in Africa

    An important part of understanding the growth prospects of an economy comes from understanding the constraints to business growth and entrepreneurship. Unfortunately, the data in this area is scarce in East Africa. The World Bank collects two sets of data in this vein, both of which suffer from some well-known issues such as the focus being solely on formal firms, medium to...

    23 May 2017 | Tavneet Suri, Louis Dorval, Neema Iyer

  • Event

    FDI, SMEs, firm growth, and trade in East Africa

    Strong and competitive firms form the core of economic activity. They contribute to economic development through job creation, higher government revenue, and increased wealth and well-being of society. Although firms, FDI, and trade already play an important role in the development of East Africa, the region has not yet tapped into its full potential. In addition, the...

    29 March 2017