Showing all content in Bangladesh

  • Blog post

    Building back better: Fostering gender equality in Bangladeshi readymade garment industry

    Post-COVID-19 recovery in one of Bangladesh’s largest industries could lead to increased inclusivity thanks to external market pressures.  Editor's note: This blog is part of our International Women's Day campaign and contains findings from this IGC project. In Bangladesh, inclusive and resilient employment generation has received considerable policy focus as a...

    30 Mar 2021 | Farria Naeem

  • Project

    Economic impacts of COVID-19 on workers and firms in Bangladesh's garment sector

    The COVID-19 pandemic is striking the global apparel value chain extremely hard from multiple directions. Apparel sectors in developing countries, which play critical roles in these countries’ industrialisation and economic growth, are arguably most vulnerable to this shock. In Bangladesh, where the apparel sector constitutes more than 80% of exports, the Bangladesh...

    1 Nov 2020 | Laura Boudreau, Farria Naeem, Rachel Heath

  • Project

    Improving state capacity to target extreme poverty: An evaluation of a randomised intervention in Bangladesh

    Scarce resources for social transfers and public services tend to be misallocated where they are needed the most – in developing countries. To improve the allocation, most existing impact evaluations have focused on monitoring, incentives and accountability; and they have largely ignored that local government representatives responsible for selecting beneficiaries of...

    5 Oct 2020 | Atonu Rabbani

  • Event

    Smart containment strategies for COVID-19 in Bangladesh

    You can watch a recording of the event in its entirety...

    2 July 2020

  • Blog post

    Using e-governance data to improve public service delivery: Evidence from land record changes in Bangladesh

    Improving monitoring and evaluation information flows in government bureaucracies can improve service delivery even without explicit incentive structures Studies have shown that better incentive structures for civil servants improve the way they provide public services (Finan et al. 2017). However, due to political constraints it is often difficult to introduce...

    26 Jun 2020 | Martin Mattsson

  • Blog post

    Responding to the impacts of COVID-19 on informal workers in South Asia

    Informal workers contribute the most to the economy in the region but are excluded from the legal and contractual protections of formal workers. As the COVID-19 crisis continues to unfold across the world, informal workers remain exceptionally vulnerable to the economic and labour market shocks of the pandemic. Many of these workers are likely to lose their jobs and face...

    13 May 2020 | Hina Shaikh

  • Blog post

    Social norms and firm productivity in Bangladeshi garment factories

    Low firm productivity in developing countries presents a key barrier to economic development. Existing economic literature largely focuses on the effects of managers’ and workers’ behaviours on firm productivity (e.g., misallocation of female labour inside the firm). In contrast, we ask why certain behaviours that negatively impact firm productivity arise. We focus on...

    28 Feb 2020 | Laura Boudreau, Noam Yuchtman, Oren Reshef, Sakib Ifetkh Mahmood

  • Publication - Project Report

    Female managers and well-being in the Bangladeshi garment industry

    14 Feb 2020 | Christopher Woodruff, Anaise Williams

  • Blog post

    Improving labour standards: Enforcement interventions by multinationals in Bangladesh

    When MNCs enforce garment factory Safety Committee law on external suppliers, compliance and safety indicators improve. Importantly, the degree to which they improve depends on the supplier’s organisational capacity. In developing countries, governments often lack the capacity or the political will to update and enforce regulations (Dal Bó and Finan, 2016), including...

    6 Feb 2020 | Laura Boudreau

  • Project

    Worker well-being and productivity in the Bangladesh garment sector

    Recent research suggests stress may affect worker productivity and thereby the accumulation of other forms of human capital. The garment sector is the largest employer of female workers in Bangladesh, the majority of whom have migrated from outside the area where the factories are located. These urban and peri-urban areas are characterised by inadequate basic services and...

    6 Dec 2019 | Atonu Rabbani, Christopher Woodruff, Paula Lopez-Pena, Muhammad Mozumder