Showing all content in Cities

  • Blog post

    Urbanisation and structural transformation in Africa

    Urbanisation is central to Africa’s development, yet the basic facts of the process remain a puzzle to social scientists and policymakers alike. Economists typically explain urbanisation through the combination of two forces: agricultural push and industrial pull. Agricultural gains provide the initial impetus to urbanisation because they allow food requirements to be...

    1 Nov 2019 | Sebastian Kriticos

  • Blog post

    Treedistribution: Combatting environmental inequality in cities

    Inequality is not a recent phenomenon. One root of inequality can be traced back to pre-historic urban civilisations, where grain stores varied in size and the grain-wealthy clustered together in particular locations. But with the increasing importance of inequality across and within countries over time, governments have often first turned their attention to addressing the...

    31 Oct 2019 | Oliver Harman

  • Blog post

    The costs of urban giants in sub-Saharan Africa

    Several African cities have become veritable urban giants. Lagos and Cairo are each home to more than 20 million people, while others like Kinshasa, Luanda, and Dar es Salaam continue to grow at breakneck speed. The way these major cities grow will have tremendous impacts on future development in Africa. Cities can be inherently productive spaces because they bring people...

    30 Oct 2019 | Sebastian Kriticos

  • Multimedia Item - Video

    Financing Pakistan's cities

    New decentralisation laws in Pakistan have created opportunities for Punjab's cities to increase revenues raised from property and land. A new video looks at how the IGC advised policymakers on its tax reform agenda and in strengthening revenue collections through incentives.

    28 Oct 2019

  • Publication - Case study

    The BRT and the danfo: A case study of Lagos’ transport reforms from 1999-2019

    Over the last 20 years, Lagos has had to make large-scale investments in transport infrastructure to keep up with its growing population. Most notably, in 2008, Lagos opened the first ever Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system on the African continent. Today, the system boasts two different lines which cover over 35.5 km of track and transport over 350,000 commuters on a daily...

    28 Oct 2019 | Biodun Otunola, Sebastian Kriticos, Oliver Harman

  • Multimedia Item - Video

    The importance of bus rapid transit systems (BRTs) for cities

    Astrid Haas, Senior Country Economist and Manager of the Cities that Work Initiative, shares her thoughts on the most game-changing research of the past decade and discusses the importance of bus rapid transit systems for cities.

    28 Oct 2019

  • Publication - Project Report

    Improving access to labour markets for refugees: Evidence from Uganda

    24 Oct 2019 | Francesco Loiacono, Mariajose Silva Vargas

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Improving access to labour markets for refugees: Evidence from Uganda

    24 Oct 2019 | Francesco Loiacono, Mariajose Silva Vargas

  • Event

    Can Special Economic Zones drive growth in urbanising Africa?

    As urban population growth in Africa continues to surge, so too does unemployment, informality and the growing bulge of disgruntled youth. A staggering two-thirds of the investments in urban infrastructure required to support these populations by 2050, are yet to be made, or $93 billion per year. Special Economic Zones, or SEZ’s, have become a popular instrument to try...

    13 November 2019