Bhaskar Chakravorty

Bhaskar Chakravorty is a PhD student at the University of Warwick’s Institute for Employment Research (IER) and is a Chancellor’s International Scholar (CIS). He holds over 13 years of experience working on a range of development issues. His research interests include development economics, labour economics and applied econometrics.

Content by Bhaskar Chakravorty
  • Blog post

    Informing youth about job opportunities to make training programmes more effective

    Launched in 2014 by the central government, Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Garmeen Kaushalya Yojana seeks to provide skills-based training to rural, marginalised youth, and to place them in salaried jobs. Based on an experiment conducted in Bihar and Jharkhand, this article shows that providing detailed information about the programme and prospective jobs to the trainees, helps align...

    20 May 2021 | Wiji Arulampalam, Bhaskar Chakravorty, Clément Imbert, Roland Rathelot

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Making training programmes more effective: Evidence from the DDU-GKY programme in India

    To tackle youth unemployment, the Indian government implements large-scale training programmes combined with job placement. The effectiveness of these programmes is hampered by high drop-out rates.

    18 May 2021 | Bhaskar Chakravorty, Wiji Arulampalam, Clément Imbert, Roland Rathelot

  • Project

    Short and long-term impacts of the lockdown on young rural migrants from Bihar and Jharkhand

    India’s national COVID-19 lockdown has had a tremendous effect on the economy. Labour migrants are among the most affected, usually employed in informal, low-paid jobs, many of them are now without work with no social protection, no assistance from previous employers, and no network to fall back to in their 'host’ states. This project will provide unique evidence on...

    23 Jul 2020 | Clément Imbert, Bhaskar Chakravorty

  • Project

    Improving skills in Bihar: How to reduce drop-out rates from training programmes?

    India, like other developing countries, suffers from low productivity of labour (Bloom et al. 2014). Training the labour force is the primary policy to increase skills and labour productivity. However, the literature has shown that designing successful training programmes is difficult (Blattman and Ralston 2016, McKenzie 2017). In many instances, they suffer from low...

    16 Dec 2019 | Roland Rathelot, Wiji Arulampalam, Bhaskar Chakravorty, Clément Imbert