Sally Murray

Sally Murray formerly managed the IGC Rwanda’s Cities portfolio, and was also Senior Country Economist. She has previously managed the IGC Rwanda’s research into tax policy and administration, public sector performance, and energy. Before moving to Rwanda in 2014, Sally worked as Country Economist for the IGC in South Sudan, and as Research Manager at the Centre for Effective Altruism. She holds a BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Balliol College, Oxford, and an MSc in Development Studies Research (with Distinction) from the LSE. Her research interests are in urbanisation, tourism, education, and the role of technology in development.

Content by Sally Murray
  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Housing need in Kigali: Findings and policy reflections

    16 Jul 2019 | Jonathan Bower, Sally Murray

  • Publication - Project Report

    Housing need in Kigali

    10 Jul 2019 | Jonathan Bower, Sally Murray, Robert Buckley, Laura Wainer

  • Project

    Urbanisation in Rwanda: Future driver of growth

    Urbanisation affects where individuals live, what firms produce, and the composition of the local economy. Researchers wrote a policy note on key challenges to urbanisation in Rwanda They recommended that the Rwandan government should look at urbanisation beyond the strict definition of investment in structures, and should also focus more broadly at rural-urban...

    16 Jan 2019 | Sally Murray

  • Project

    Housing need in Kigali

    The Government of Rwanda would like to understand the quantity of housing need in Kigali, and to update it from an earlier 2012 study conducted by the European Union, as well as to understand how to expand low-cost housing. This project estimates: i) the quantity of housing needed in Kigali, Rwanda; and ii) the purchasing power of tenant and mortgage-holding...

    8 Jan 2019 | Jonathan Bower, Sally Murray, Robert Buckley, Laura Wainer

  • Publication - Project Report

    Remote sensing for measuring housing supply in Kigali

    30 May 2018 | Felix Bachofer, Sally Murray

  • Project

    Remote sensing for measuring housing supply in Kigali

    In Kigali, data on the building stock of the city is poor. This inhibits efforts towards land valuation, and the increased tax revenues that can arise from that. This project tested the potential of remote sensing, specifically satellite imagery, as a cost-effective way to monitor the city’s building stock, and how it has changed over time. Researchers created a...

    30 May 2018 | Felix Bachofer, Sally Murray

  • Publication - Country study

    Consolidating peace and legitimacy in Rwanda

    This country study is published by the LSE-Oxford Commission on State Fragility, Growth and Development.

    19 Apr 2018 | William Jones, Sally Murray

  • Project

    Fiscal impacts of a presumptive tax for microenterprises in Rwanda

    This report examines the impact of the 2012 reform to micro and small enterprise tax law, which created a presumptive ‘flat fee’ regime in both Personal Income Tax (PIT) and Corporate Income Tax (CIT). In this regime, taxpayers whose turnover falls within a given band pay a fixed liability, with a zero marginal tax rate. Subsequent years have seen growth in both...

    9 Nov 2017 | Nada Eissa, Sally Murray, Andrew Zeitlin

  • Publication - Project Report

    Fiscal impacts of a presumptive tax for microenterprises in Rwanda

    24 Oct 2017 | Nada Eissa, Sally Murray, Andrew Zeitlin

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Tourism value chains in East Africa

    The importance of tourism for economic growth in Rwanda is hard to overstate. Tourism revenues are now more than double those of its next biggest export, tea. All of its other major exports are strongly beholden to international commodity price fluctuations, making revenues highly unreliable. Tourism is a strong job-creating sector in the wider region, however it...

    23 Mar 2017 | Sally Murray, Sebastian Wolf

  • Blog post

    Building affordable housing in Kigali

    Solving the challenge of affordable urban housing remains a key concern to urban planners and city officials in rapidly urbanising cities. This blog examines a new costing tool that researchers used to model the cost factors of two promising housing designs for low-income markets. Can incrementalism and multi-story construction be effectively scaled to expand access to...

    21 Mar 2017 | Sally Murray, Brian Halusan

  • Publication - Working Paper

    An effective property tax regime for Rwanda

    14 Mar 2017 | Mihaly Kopanyi, Sally Murray

  • Project

    Best practice for implementing affordable housing in Kigali

    Supply of adequate low-income housing is vital for productive cities. Researchers provided valuable input into Rwanda’s planned incremental-build, low-income neighbourhood. Incremental housing has potential to provide home seekers with well-serviced land, infrastructure, and foundational structures for extendable homes. Kigali has a critical shortage of...

    1 Nov 2016 | Billy Ndengeyingoma, Laura Wainer, Sally Murray

  • Publication - Project Report

    Incremental housing, and other design principles for low-cost housing

    1 Nov 2016 | Laura Wainer, Billy Ndengeyingoma, Sally Murray

  • Publication - Project Report

    Managing accessibility for sustainable development of Kigali, Rwanda

    4 Oct 2016 | Jit Bajpai , Tatiana Peralta Quiros, Sally Murray

  • Project

    Managing accessibility for sustainable development

    Due to accelerated population growth, weak institutional capacity, inherent deficiencies in existing infrastructure services and limited fiscal space, most cities of the developing world are struggling to manage and guide harmonious development of their cities. The result is soaring deficiency of affordable housing, long commutes, congestion, pollution and steady...

    4 Oct 2016 | Jit Bajpai , Tatiana Peralta Quiros, Sally Murray

  • Blog post

    The incidence and impact of Electronic Billing Machines for VAT in Rwanda

    Donor aid represents roughly 40 percent of Rwanda’s national budget. Expanding the tax base has been a crucial strategy in curbing its dependence on foreign aid.  Value-added tax (VAT) is the largest tax-based contribution to government revenues in Rwanda and has been identified as a key priority for raising overall revenue. In August 2013, the Rwandan government passed...

    15 Apr 2016 | Eva Ghirmai, Sarah Logan, Sally Murray

  • Blog post

    Hidden inequality: Data unmasked

    New data on median incomes suggests that traditional data on mean income might be skewing measures of inequality and poverty. Today's blog, by IGC Country Economist Sally Murray takes a look at the hidden depths of inequality in Nigeria, as uncovered by newly published data collected by the Center of Global Development. Off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria, land is...

    19 Feb 2016 | Sally Murray

  • Publication - Project Memo

    Government support for low income housing in Kigali (Project Memo)

    9 Feb 2016 | Robert Buckley, Sally Murray

  • Blog post

    Half-built homes can ease slums

    Could an architectural innovation in Chile be the answer to low-cost housing? The IGC's Sally Murray looks at a Chilean housing project providing half-built homes for the urban poor. Using an 'incremental construction' approach, the design allows low-income residents to add to and expand upon their homes, over time, as financing constraints are relaxed. In the lofty...

    1 Feb 2016 | Sally Murray

  • Blog post

    Focus on poverty: Support package works for 'ultra-poor'

    A landmark study covered by The Guardian and The Economist highlights a way to sustainably move people out of extreme poverty using a reliable, scalable and cost-effective model. The findings, which come from research by my colleagues that was aired last week at a lecture in the United Kingdom, describe a programme that’s disarmingly simple. It targeted the poorest of...

    8 Jan 2016 | Sally Murray

  • Blog post

    Delivering low income housing in Rwanda

    Kigali should be an engine of growth and poverty reduction for Rwanda. But just 1,000 formal houses are built there each year, and most are too expensive for the majority low-income citizens. How can the government breathe life into the city’s low income housing market?

    23 Mar 2015 | Robert Buckley, Sally Murray