Financial incentive schemes in public health: Evidence from Sierra Leone

This brief explores findings from a field study of a community health
programme in Sierra Leone seeking to understand how financial
incentives can impact public service and public health outcomes.

  •  Sharing incentives equally between Community Health Workers
    (CHW) and their supervisors generates an increase in household
    health visits that is 61% larger than the impact achieved when
    offering the incentive either exclusively to the worker or to the
    supervisor.
  • The shared incentives scheme also translates into better access to
    pre- and post-natal care and lower disease incidence.
  • This policy brief highlights the conditions needed for shared
    incentives to be the optimal incentive structure for an organisation
    and provides insights for policy.