Tim Dobermann

Tim Dobermann was formerly Policy Economist for Bangladesh, Myanmar, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, and the thematic lead for Energy. Previously he has been Country Economist for IGC Myanmar. He holds a MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and a BSc in Economics from the University of Warwick. His research focuses on energy.

Content by Tim Dobermann
  • Project

    Rapid response to Pakistan’s Task Force on Energy Reforms

    Pakistan’s power sector is in deep need of reform. The sector suffers from chronic shortages not because of a lack of supply but due to the financial woes of the distribution companies operating throughout Pakistan. Of the electricity sold for use across the country, only 71% is recovered through bills. Such large losses risk collapsing the sector if left...

    17 Apr 2019 | Robin Burgess, Tim Dobermann, Michael Greenstone, Faraz Hayat, Usman Naeem

  • Blog post

    Revisiting the balance of payments and the fiscal deficit

    Countries left-and-right are battling fiscal crises. Have we been too stringent, or not enough? This last blog in a series thinks about how fiscal policy might look different in unorthodox times. A prudent fiscal stance and a healthy balance of payments have been standard prescriptions for emerging economies.  Manageable debts and a slim deficit keep macroeconomic crises...

    1 Oct 2018 | Tim Dobermann, Francesco Caselli

  • Multimedia Item - Video

    Facebook live interview with Jeffrey Sachs

    Tim Dobermann (International Growth Centre) speaks to Jeffrey Sachs, Professor of Economics at Columbia University, about the tradeoffs between economic growth and sustainable development.

    25 Sep 2018

  • Blog post

    Rethinking traditional structural transformation

    How much will the old patterns of economic growth explain the experience of tomorrow’s growing economies? While the evolution of an economy into different sectors is a natural process of development, the fourth blog in this series examines how the composition of growth could look very different in the future. The shift of labour from the countryside into higher...

    24 Sep 2018 | Tim Dobermann, Francesco Caselli

  • Blog post

    Adjusting the export-for-growth model

    Trade brings numerous benefits, chief among them competition, yet today’s outlook for trade remains uncertain. Is it time to re-think the primacy of exporting for growth? This third blog in a series explores the issue. A successful development model in the last few decades has been for developing countries with low labour costs to jump on the lowest rung of the value...

    17 Sep 2018 | Tim Dobermann, Francesco Caselli

  • Blog post

    Are we living in unorthodox times?

    How different is today’s environment for developing countries compared to a few decades ago? The second blog in this series examines four trends that will shape how countries grow and develop in the future. The most admired development strategies of the last few decades were deployed at a time of historically unprecedented global integration. Driven by both increasingly...

    10 Sep 2018 | Tim Dobermann, Francesco Caselli

  • Blog post

    Op-ed: Unorthodox policies for unorthodox times

    From protectionism to automation to climate change, today’s global context is changing. What does this mean for the development strategies countries choose to pursue? This blog, the first in a series of five, looks at how today’s context should influence our thinking. New political forces, embracing economic ideologies that had been dormant for decades, are on the...

    4 Sep 2018 | Tim Dobermann, Francesco Caselli

  • Blog post

    Conflict and firms: Industrial organisation in the face of insecurity

    Conflict has a long shadow, and its role in inhibiting development is clear. Today, a billion and a half people live in countries affected by fragility, conflict, or violence (World Bank 2011). The important decisions individuals make in their daily lives – where to travel, where to live, where to work – are all haunted by the spectre of violence. Not only does personal...

    6 Feb 2018 | Tim Dobermann

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Developing Yangon’s periphery (Myanmar version)

    30 Jan 2017 | Tim Dobermann

  • Publication - Policy Brief

    Developing Yangon’s periphery

    30 Jan 2017 | Tim Dobermann

  • Publication - Policy Brief, Policy note

    Urban Myanmar

    Cities conjure a sense of commotion. They can be hives of economic activity and interaction or centres of congestion and crime. Today, the majority of the world’s population lives in urban areas. Before the industrial age, cities as we think of them today were less common. There were hubs for commercial trade and administration, but people resided in rural areas, engaging...

    26 Jan 2017 | Tim Dobermann

  • Publication -

    Energy in Myanmar (Myanmar version)

    Economic growth requires energy. Energy fuels industry and manufacturing, improves livelihoods, and connects markets. Consuming more energy is part of transforming into a modern economy. The historical relationship is quite clear: over time, economies which grow continue to do so while using more energy. Comparing per capita income and energy consumption figures across...

    9 Jan 2017 | Tim Dobermann

  • Blog post

    Transforming Myanmar’s energy sector

    Myanmar, like other developing countries, will continue ramping up its energy production to meet growing demands for consumption. This blog argues that fuelling economic growth requires expanded electricity access and reforms to pricing structure and policies for Myanmar. Economic growth requires energy. Energy fuels industry and manufacturing, improves livelihoods, and...

    4 Oct 2016 | Tim Dobermann

  • Publication - Policy note

    Energy in Myanmar

    Economic growth requires energy. Energy fuels industry and manufacturing, improves livelihoods, and connects markets. Consuming more energy is part of transforming into a modern economy. The historical relationship is quite clear: over time, economies which grow continue to do so while using more energy. Comparing per capita income and energy consumption figures...

    12 Apr 2016 | Tim Dobermann