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  • Blog post

    Women’s mobility and labour force participation in Karachi: Some preliminary observations

    Pakistan has the lowest female labour-force participation rate in South Asia[1] and urban areas perform especially poorly[2]. Distinct patriarchal norms interlinked with migrant status can affect women’s autonomy and thus labour-force participation in different ways. Recently the Collective for Social Science Research conducted fieldwork for the IGC supported project...

    7 Jun 2019 | Natasha Ansari

  • Blog post

    Adapting to climate change through temporary migration in Bangladesh

    With climate change, we are seeing more extreme weather events and increasingly frequent hazards, putting agriculture and rural livelihoods at ever greater risk. Temporary migration can help households withstand these types of short-term hardships and income deficits, and may be a viable mechanism for adapting “in place” to changing environmental conditions. However,...

    29 May 2019 | Joyce Chen, Nazmul Hassan

  • Blog post

    Getting the right institutions in place to run Africa’s cities efficiently

    Over the next 16 years, all of the world’s 10 fastest growing cities are going to be in Africa. If this growth is a process of people voting with their feet, as last year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics Paul Romer once put it, these cities are winning. Yet urbanisation in many developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is not delivering the...

    22 May 2019 | Astrid Haas, Shahrukh Wani

  • Blog post

    India 2019: Catching the clickbait generation

    A group of young people greater than the population of Germany will vote for the first time in India’s 17 Lok Sabha elections. LSE PhD student Tom Wilkinson explains why this segment of the Indian electorate has become such an important demographic during this year’s election campaign. The ruling Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) launched a rap video for first-time voters a...

    21 May 2019 | Tom Wilkinson

  • Blog post

    IGC Quick Clicks: DFID’s new leader and what it means for UK aid

    On 1 May, UK Prime Minister Theresa May appointed a new Secretary of State for International Development. Rory Stewart, who was previously serving as Minister of State for Prisons, was appointed after a cabinet reshuffle that saw the previous Secretary, Penny Mordaunt, picked to be the country’s first female Defence Secretary. What might this new leadership mean for the...

    20 May 2019 | Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    Urban density and the promises of proximity

    As an economist, an end of year tradition is to muse over The Royal Society of Statistics, ‘Statistic of the Year’. In 2018, the singled out stat was: 90.5% - the proportion of plastic waste that has never been recycled. An important statistic, but an area in which the International Growth Centre’s (IGC) ‘Cities that Work’ initiative has limited...

    16 May 2019 | Oliver Harman

  • Blog post

    Improving land security through community-based organisations

    Researchers and policymakers agree that secure land rights constitute a vital pillar for sustained livelihood improvements among marginalized populations, but existing solutions have been primarily top-down in orientation. Can community-based organisations help to improve land security from the ground up? Bihar state law guarantees each rural household the right to hold...

    9 May 2019 | Andre Joshua Nickow, Sanjay Kumar

  • Blog post

    Don’t shoot the messenger – electricity theft and trust in Karachi, Pakistan

    We assume that more information makes markets work better. Information can provide individuals incentives to act better. However, in some situations, information on poor behaviour can lead to mistrust, not just of other people, but of the institution that delivers the message. The Karachi setting Karachi is Pakistan’s largest city and industrial hub, home to 16.6...

    7 May 2019 | Erum Haider

  • Blog post

    Should graduation programmes replace the more conventional cash transfers?

    The past decade has seen an exponential rise in social protection initiatives – mostly in the form of unconditional cash transfer programmes. In Latin America, Africa and South Asia, these emerge as promising interventions to reduce poverty. There is also a rising global trend of using conditionalities linked to such transfers to increase school enrolment, and access to...

    3 May 2019 | Hina Shaikh

  • Blog post

    Increasing religious awareness and professional training

    The discovery of natural gas triggered violent extremism in Northern Mozambique. Could religious awareness and professional training quell violence? [caption id="attachment_28440" align="alignnone" width="768"] Figure 1: The Economist, Aug 9th 2018.[/caption] There is vast economic and political science literature on conflict and civil wars, which mostly focuses on the...

    1 May 2019 | Inês Vilela, Pedro Vicente