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  • Blog post

    Designing national healthcare: Challenges and opportunities for Ayushman Bharat

    As India’s population ages, the demand for tertiary healthcare to treat non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments is increasing rapidly. Estimates from the World Health Organisation show that deaths in India due to non-communicable diseases increased from 4.2 million in 2000 to 5.8 million in 2016. Over the same period, deaths...

    17 Dec 2018 | Sisir Debnath, Dibya Mishra , Tarun Jain, Revathy Suryanarayana

  • Blog post

    The supply chain for seed in Uganda: Where does it all go wrong?

    Seed quality is a major concern in Uganda Evidence from recent studies suggests low country-wide adoption of improved seeds by farmers. Farmers prefer to use home-saved seeds, indicating that they did not perceive the benefits of improved seed to be worth the cost (Tripp and Rohrbach, 2001; Remington et al., 2002; Sperling et al., 2008).  This has been linked to several...

    14 Dec 2018 | Nathan Fiala

  • Blog post

    Are women politicians good for economic growth?

    There has been a phenomenal global increase in the proportion of women in politics in the last two decades. We find that constituencies that elect women experience significantly higher growth in economic activity through the electoral term than similar constituencies that elect men.

    4 Dec 2018 | Sonia Bhalotra

  • Blog post

    Reforming Pakistan’s tax system: Evidence-based suggestions

    As Pakistan fails to collect a decent proportion of own-source revenue, it has little choice than to take on debt or depend on more creative means, such as a recent crowdfunding campaign, to fund public projects.  Where does Pakistan stand? Pakistan tax-to-GDP ratio is about 12% . In comparison, OECD countries raise taxes equivalent to about 34% of their GDP. This limits...

    3 Dec 2018 | Shahrukh Wani

  • Blog post

    IGC Quick Clicks: The unintended consequences of policies

    Have you ever made a decision and felt it was rational and well thought through only to later realise it resulted in something you had never imagined? Now, think about how this would apply to national policies. The possible indirect impacts are innumerable and sometimes unforeseeable. This post looks at the unintended consequences public policies and interventions have had...

    30 Nov 2018 | Nidhi Parekh

  • Blog post

    Data for decision-making: How spatial data is shaping the African urbanisation story

    Ahead of the 17th Urban Age Conference and the first to be held in Africa, Sebastian Kriticos and Astrid Haas discuss the need for better data to tackle some of Africa’s biggest urbanisation challenges. On a daily basis, city policymakers need to take decisions: where and how to deliver services, what rates to apply to taxes and where to make investments, amongst others....

    26 Nov 2018 | Astrid Haas, Sebastian Kriticos

  • Blog post

    Choices, choices: Should IDOs give their employees more autonomy, or simply choose them better?

    Dan Honig argues International Development Organisations (IDOs) should give their employees more autonomy in decision-making, particularly in unpredictable situations with hard-to-measure project aims. Crucially, this presumes motivated agents. The answer to this: better hiring. Dan Honig recently published the book Navigation by Judgment - Why and When Top Down Management...

    23 Nov 2018 | Theres Lessing

  • Blog post

    Making room for Africa’s urban billion

    By 2050, more than a billion people will be living in African cities and towns. As more and more of the continent’s population – 60% of whom live in the countryside – move to urban areas, pressures on land can only intensify. How should we make room for this massive urban expansion? How will city structures have to change to accommodate Africa’s urban billion? And...

    22 Nov 2018 | Sebastian Kriticos

  • Blog post

    Land reform, redistribution, and risk: Towards an inclusive South Africa

    At the end of February 2018, a motion was put forward by the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), a far-left opposition party, to revisit South Africa’s Constitution and amend it to allow for land expropriation without compensation. This motion was successfully passed, and subsequent public hearings across the country confirmed that there was resounding support from the...

    1 Nov 2018 | Victoria Delbridge

  • Blog post

    IGC Quick Clicks: How will technology impact the future of work?

    Did you know that once upon a time in the UK there was a designated person, often a night watchman or ‘knock upper’, to wake people up every morning? Then came alarms and two centuries later, mobile phones – with them the job of ‘knock upper’ died. These and many other ‘machines’ have slowly made previously staple jobs redundant. Technology has been changing...

    26 Oct 2018 | Nidhi Parekh