Emilie Yam

Emilie Yam is the Policy Communications Manager in the IGC London Hub, promoting the IGC’s ideas for growth, research findings, and policy advice to its key audiences. She has previously worked for the World Wide Web Foundation, the US Agency for International Development, and CNN. She holds a Master’s Degree in International Development from Georgetown University and a Bachelor’s in Journalism and Political Science from the University of Tennessee.

Content by Emilie Yam
  • Blog post

    Data, incentives, and relationship building for improved tax enforcement

    Tax authorities in developing countries often lack the information and enforcement capacity necessary to collect adequate tax revenue. Both innovative and practical research, performed in collaboration with tax authorities, can address these constraints. The International Growth Centre (IGC) works closely with its partner governments to promote effective tax policies and...

    31 Aug 2018 | Emilie Yam, Ella Spencer

  • Publication - Growth Brief

    Management delivers: Why firms should invest in better business practices

    There is a stark difference in firm productivity and growth between developing and advanced economies. Improving the management of firms in developing countries can help bridge this gap. New research shows that introducing management practices to firms can have lasting impacts on their productivity and growth. When Indian firms adopted management practices, their...

    28 Mar 2018 | Nick Bloom, Leonie Dressel, Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    The Fragility Commission’s final evidence session: The power of resilience

    Countries facing fragility and conflict lack resilience to shocks, which feed off each other in a negative cycle. Identifying policies to build resilience, and recover and learn from shocks, can prevent future crises stemming from instability. In its fifth and final evidence session, held at the London School of Economics (LSE) on 28 September, the LSE-Oxford Commission...

    26 Oct 2017 | Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    Risky business: Takeaways from the Fragility Commission’s 4th evidence session

    In fragile environments, experts agree that strengthening the private sector is the key to economic and social progress. However, this is undermined by limited risk appetite and weak state capacity when investing and operating in fragile environments. LSE-Oxford Commission on State Fragility, Growth and Development In its fourth evidence session, held at the the London...

    24 Oct 2017 | Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    Building capacity in fragility: Key lessons from Fragility Commission’s 3rd evidence session

    Generating effective government capacity is key to growth and development in fragile situations. However, many obstacles prevent governments from building up this capacity including an overwhelming list of problems to solve, weak leadership, corruption within institutions, and pressure from donors. In fragile and conflict situations, governments often have little...

    24 Jul 2017 | Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    Road to legitimacy: Takeaways from the Fragility Commission’s 2nd evidence session

    The road to reforming and rebuilding the legitimacy of a state and its institutions is long and difficult. Elections, even when free and fair, are only a piece of the foundation upon which a state must re-establish trust with citizens and can start to rebuild public services, infrastructure, and its economy. “People don’t need ideas, they need bread.” This statement...

    20 Jun 2017 | Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    The new urban agenda: Cities of the future

    Emerging from two days of discussion and debate on cities at the recent IGC Cities Conference, the challenge that resonated most widely from both research and policy participants was how urban infrastructure can be adapted to accommodate rising levels of urban density. Rates of urbanisation, particularly for African cities are not expected to slow-down anytime soon....

    17 Feb 2016 | Upaasna Kaul, Emilie Yam

  • Blog post

    Graduation: What’s next for ultra-poor programmes?

    Results are in: Research shows that BRAC’s one-shot, ‘big-push’ intervention targeting the ultra-poor with assets and skills can lift extreme households onto a more sustainable path out of poverty. In this blog we presented updated findings on the long-term impact and sustainability of the approach from studies showcased at the recent IGC-BRAC conference: Tackling...

    19 Jan 2016 | Emilie Yam, Upaasna Kaul, Amanda Jinhage